Plaid

Plaid is a pattern of horizontal and vertical bands in two or more colors that cross regularly. The most obvious example is tartan, the classic Scottish pattern; gingham and Border tartans are a variant that has equal-width bands of colour in a simpler pattern.  Tattersall has very wide bands alternating with very narrow bands, again…

Stitching in Men’s Suits

The stitching obviously holds all the parts of the suit together, but that applies to the styling as well as the construction. The stitching demonstrates the quality of the work of the designer or tailor – high quality suits require firm and neat stitches on different parts of men’s suits. When it comes to the…

Trousers with no Cuffs

Turn-ups or cuffs on the trousers of a man’s suit was once de rigeur. In the 1960s however designers started to leave the trouser cuff off their creations, and this quickly became the norm – most men’s suits these days do not have trouser cuffs. Trousers with no cuffs look good on any kind of…

Trousers with Cuffs

A cuff or turn-up at the end of a trouser leg on a man’s suit is there to protect the clothing from getting frayed and torn so easily. Indeed, the history of the trouser cuff reportedly dates to working men who used to roll up their trousers in order to avoid the mud and dirt…

Trousers

Over the years, trousers for men’s suits have undergone a wide range of modifications in terms of cuts and style in accordance with the need and demand of the age. The origin of trousers can be traced back to Iranian horsemen in the 15th century. Those early trousers looked more like the tights; a century…

Straight-cut Trousers

The style of men’s suit trousers has evolved substantially over the years, and one of the most noticeable changes of the last 50 years has been in the cut of the leg. In a straight cut trouser, the leg is not noticeably flared and the lower leg in particular is the same width all the…

Slim-cut Trousers

Slim cut trousers are snugly fitted on the leg, typically with parallel edges in the lower part of the leg and very little spare fabric over the hips. The result should give the wearer a slim contour. To wear slim cut trousers with a man’s suit you need the right body shape. Ideally this means…

Single Pleats

Pleats are one of the major variations in the design of trousers for men’s suits; the pleats run down the leg from the waistband, providing extra room in the lower part of the torso for the trousers to hang correctly and cope with the stresses and strains of normal wear – sitting, twisting, standing, walking,…

Loose-cut Trousers

Trousers with a loose-cut and fit are useful in countries that have a warm and potentially sweaty climate. They are also great at defining a particular style for the wearer – either a super-casual look or the slightly overlarge zoot-suit style. Loose cut trousers have extra width both in the waist – where they are…

Flat-Front Trousers

Flat-front trousers have no pleats. This style means the trouser lies close to the body without any extra material around the lower torso; by contrast, pleated trousers on a man’s suit accommodate some extra material to allow more room and more movement. Flat front trousers have a snug, slimming fit that preserves the long, straight…